This section is for nationals of countries in the European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland. It explains how they and members of their families (whether or not they are EEA or Swiss nationals themselves) can come to, live in and work in the UK.

If you are not an EEA or Swiss national, or the family member of an EEA or Swiss national, you should not read this section.

The European Economic Area (EEA) consists of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, the Republic of Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the UK. Although Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway are not members of the European Union (EU), their citizens have the same rights as EU citizens to enter, live in and work in the UK.                             

Rights and responsibilities

This page explains whether EEA and Swiss nationals and their families can come to the UK to visit, live and work.

Residence documents for European citizens

This section explains how EEA and Swiss nationals in the UK can apply for documents to confirm their rights of residence under European law.

EEA family permits for family members

This section explains which non-European family members of EEA and Swiss nationals need an EEA family permit before they can come to the UK, and how they can apply for one.

Residence documents for family members

This section explains how the non-European family members of EEA and Swiss nationals can, while they are in the UK,apply for documents to confirm their rights of residence under European law.

Worker Registration Scheme

This scheme has now closed. Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovakian and Slovenian nationalsdonot need to obtain our permission before they work in the UK.

Bulgarian and Romanian nationals

Most Bulgarian and Romanian nationals cannot start working in the UK without our permission. This section explains how they can apply for that permission.

Derivative rights of residence under EU law

A person who does not qualify for a right of residence under the free movement directive (Directive 2004/38/EC) may qualify for another right of residence under EU law. These are known as ‘derivative rights’ because they come from (are ‘derived’ from) EU law, not from the directive.

School children travelling in organised school groups

School children, who are visa nationals, and are resident in an EEA country do not need a visa if visiting or transiting the UK as a member of an organised school group.

If you would like to find out more about how we can help, please Contact Us.

We can’t provide specific advice on your matter before you become a client, but we can give you an honest assessment of whether you’d benefit from a follow up appointment. Naturally, everything you tell us will be treated in complete confidence.

Call Now: 0208 127 6770 or Email:  mail@rcsolicitor.co.uk